West Chicago, IL
630-293-3668
Whiting, IN
219-659-3338


 

By Michael A. Schwartzman, DPM
April 27, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Bunions  

BunionsWhat is a Bunion?

Are you dealing with a bunion? A bunion is a protrusion of the bone at the base of the big toe. While a bunion may seem like a bump, according to the (APMA) American Podiatric Medical Association a bunion is actually the enlargement of the joint at the base of the big toe – the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint. While bunions are a common foot disorder, it is not something that you should ignore as bunions can cause discomfort and become inflamed if left untreated.
 

What Causes Bunions?

Bunions can be hereditary and aggravated by the shoes you wear, especially high heels or shoes that don’t have enough room for your toes. Certain factors can also contribute to the development of bunions, such as if you have flat feet or low arches or if your feet pronate (when the ankles roll in towards each other during movement and cause excessive and prolonged pressure on the joints in the feet). If you are dealing with bunions, or think that you are, it’s important to seek help from a qualified podiatrist to get the care you need to relieve your pain and discomfort.
 

How a Podiatrist Can Help

Your podiatrist may recommend certain conservative at home steps you can take to minimize the discomfort. The first thing they may recommend is that you look at or change the kind of shoes you wear. It’s important to find shoes that are wide enough to accommodate your toes. Shoes such as high heels are likely to make the problem worse. Bunion pads can also help with your discomfort.
Severe bunion pain can restrict your mobility. Untreated bunions can continue to get worse if you don’t do something about them and can lead to other issues such as calluses and corns, or you may experience pain or redness on the site of the bunion, as well as swelling.
Other treatment options include orthotics or a combination of physical therapy and medication to relieve pressure and inflammation of the bunion. In severe cases, surgery may be needed to resolve the issue.
 

Prevention is Key

We all like to remain active, and oftentimes it is the result of this activity that can make your bunion pain worse. You should visit your podiatrist if you notice any issues so they can be caught and treated as early as possible. Call our office today.

Anytime a person engages in sports, they are running the risk of suffering an injury to the foot and ankle. Many of the injuries that cause foot ailments and pain are caused by high-impact sports, such as running. Other times foot problems can arise from wearing improper footwear or from inadequate training.

There are a number of foot conditions that an athlete can suffer from, including ingrown toenails, athlete’s foot and blisters. Let’s take a brief look at two of the more serious and most common conditions: plantar fasciitis and ankle sprains. When these conditions occur, your podiatrist is available to provide you with the best treatment available.

Heel Pain Caused By Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common foot ailments experienced by runners and the most common cause of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a thick, dense tissue that runs from the ball of the foot along the arch, connecting to the heel. People with flat feet or individuals who overpronate are more susceptible to heel pain because of the increased stress that occurs at the heel.

Many times the pain is worse in the morning when you first get up, but subsides as you move around throughout the day. Treatment will vary depending on each case, but generally rest, ice and stretching can help ease the pain. When conservative treatments aren’t effective and the pain persists, see your podiatrist for recommended treatment, such as orthotics.

Ankle Sprains

Caused by an unnatural twisting or force on the ankle bones, an ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries experienced by athletes. The severity of a sprain will depend on the extent of the stretching and tearing of ligaments. How severe the tear is will determine how long it takes for your ankle to heal - sometimes up to several months. When a sprain first occurs, there will likely be chronic ankle pain. The ankle will swell, and discoloration may occur. 

The RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation) procedure should be administered right away for an ankle sprain. Serious ankle sprains, particularly among competitive athletes, may require surgery to repair and tighten the damaged ligaments. If you’re prone to ankle sprains, avoid running on uneven terrain and wear firm, supportive footwear for improved stability. Unfortunately, ankle sprains are often recurring. Your podiatrist can help determine the severity of your sprain and the necessary course of treatment, including exercises to strengthen your weak ankle. 

Heel pain and ankle sprains can be easily treated, yet many athletes delay proper treatment for fear of discontinuing their favorite sport. Delaying treatment will only make the injury worse, often times leading to a far more serious injury that requires extensive care and treatment. If you frequently participate in sports and other physical activities, it’s important to pay close attention to your feet and ankles as they are placed under tremendous pressure and are at high risk for injury.

Remember to train properly for your specific activity and wear supportive shoes that offer stability for your specific sport.  If you are experiencing pain for extended periods of time, take time to rest. Chronic pain likely indicates a serious foot problem and continuing to play your sport will only make matters worse. Talk to your podiatrist about the best ways to prevent and treat common sports-related foot injuries.

By Michael A. Schwartzman, DPM
March 05, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Running   Proper Footwear  

Most people do not realize the tremendous amount of pressure that is put on their feet during exercise. During running, the 26 bones, 33 joints,112 ligaments, and networkPeople exercising of nerves and tendons that make up the foot all work together. Improper foot care during exercise can cause ailments from athlete’s foot to blisters, from corns to heel pain. Your podiatrist is here to help you stay active and keep running without damaging your feet. 

Check Your Shoes

One of the most important things you can do for your feet while exercising is wear proper shoes, especially if there is running involved. Good shoes need to provide cushioning for shock absorption because of the force you are putting on your legs, ankles and feet when you run. It's important to select a pair of shoes designed for the shape of your foot and its natural structure and inclination. 

Shop for shoes at the end of the day, when your feet are slightly swollen to ensure a good fit. It also helps to wear the type of socks you will wear when running when you try on new shoes. If you use an orthotic, bring that as well. Look for lightweight, breathable shoes to ensure comfort, and consider buying two pairs and rotating them to extend the life of each pair. Running shoes should be replaced about every 400 miles. 

Other Guidelines for Foot Care

Aside from having the right shoes for exercise, there are also other measures you can take to preserve the health of your feet. 

  • Wash your feet every day and make sure they are dried thoroughly. 
  • Good quality, well-fitting socks is also important for foot care. 
  • The more weight that is put on your feet, the more strain there is. 
  • Being in shape and being at a healthy weight will help take some of the stress off of your feet. 
  • Avoid walking barefoot. 
  • Do not ignore any foot pain. 

Contact your podiatrist as soon as you feel any pain in your feet. The earlier an ailment is diagnosed, the easier it is to heal. 

By Michael A. Schwartzman, DPM
February 07, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Orthotics  

If your feet are suffering from pain or other ailments, you are in luck! Your podiatrist offers custom orthotics to help you stand, walk and run more efficiently and comfortably.  

What Are Orthotics?

Orthotics are essentially pads or shoe inserts that have been sculpted to achieve a particular effect on your foot when you walk on them. They can be placed inside many different types of shoes, depending on their thickness and the fit of the shoe in question.

Orthotic devices come in many shapes, sizes and materials to help alleviate your foot ailments. At your local podiatrist, we utilize orthotics to alter or modify foot function. They are designed to treat, adjust and support various biomechanical foot disorders. The most effective are custom-made orthotics, which are created to meet the specific needs of an individual’s foot shape and problem.

They also fall under three different categories: rigid, soft and semi-rigid orthotics. While more rigid orthotics help to control the motion of the foot, softer orthotics mimic sometimes missing or inadequate padding and support on the bottom of the foot.

Why Are Orthotics Prescribed?

Your podiatrist prescribes orthotics as a conservative approach to many foot problems, or as a method of control after certain types of foot surgery. Orthotics correct an abnormal walking patterns and support your foot. By slightly altering the angles at which the foot strikes a walking or running surface, orthotics make standing, walking and running much more comfortable.

Visit your podiatrist today for an evaluation and remain on track for healthy, pain-free feet with orthotics!

By Michael A. Schwartzman, DPM
January 03, 2018
Category: Foot Care

A parent should never ignore their child’s complaints about pain in their feet. We never want our children to be in pain, and it is especially important to protect their feet to allow them to remain active. But your child should never play through the pain, as it can lead to difficulty in walking that can require complicated therapy. Your podiatrist is available to help diagnose your child’s foot troubles, while also providing the best care possible to get them on their feet and running around again.

Heel pain is a common childhood complaint, but that doesn’t mean it should be ignored, or that you should wait to see if the pain will go away. Heel pain is a symptom, not a disease. In other words, heel pain is a warning sign that a child has a condition that needs attention.

Your child may not know to or be able to articulate to you that they are in pain. Keep in mind that heel pain in children is often associated with these signs and symptoms: 

  • Limping
  • Walking on toes
  • Difficulty participating in usual activities or sports

Treatment from your child’s podiatrist will depend on the diagnosis and the severity of the pain. For mild heel pain, treatment options might include a reduction in activity and cushioning the heel with temporary shoe inserts. For moderate heel pain, in addition to reducing activity and cushioning the heel, your podiatrist might use medications, physical therapy, and orthotic devices. If your child has severe heel pain, immobilization, follow-up measures or surgery might be needed. 

Schedule an appointment with your podiatrist if your child is experiencing heel pain of any kind. The cause of the pain isn't likely to disappear on its own, and waiting has the potential of making a small problem into a big one.





This website includes materials that are protected by copyright, or other proprietary rights. Transmission or reproduction of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use, as defined in the copyright laws, requires the written permission of the copyright owners.

Archive:

Tags

Podiatrist - West Chicago, IL
1213 Joliet St, Suite C
West Chicago, IL 60185
(630) 293-3668

Podiatrist - Whiting, IN
1104 119th Street
Whiting, IN 46394
(219) 659-3338